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research-article

STATE-OF-THE-ART COOLING TECHNOLOGY FOR A TURBINE ROTOR BLADE

[+] Author and Article Information
Jason Town

Postdoctoral Researcher, Pennsylvania State University – Applied Research Lab, College Park, PA 16802
jet234@psu.edu

Douglas Straub

National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26505
douglas.straub@netl.doe.gov

James Black

National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236
james.black@netl.doe.gov

Karen A. Thole

Pennsylvania State University, College Park, PA 16802
kthole@engr.psu.edu

Tom I-P. Shih

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
tomshih@purdue.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039942 History: Received March 02, 2018; Revised March 26, 2018

Abstract

Effective internal and external cooling of airfoils is key to maintaining component life for efficient gas turbines. Cooling designs have spanned the range from simple internal convective channels to more advanced double-walls with shaped film-cooling holes. This paper describes the development of an internal and external cooling concept for a state-of-the-art cooled turbine blade. These cooling concepts are based on a review of literature and patents, as well as, interactions with academic and industry turbine cooling experts. The cooling configuration selected and described in this paper is referred to as the "baseline" design, since this design will simultaneously be tested with other more advanced blade cooling designs in a rotating turbine test facility using a "rainbow turbine wheel" configuration. For the baseline design, the leading edge is cooled by internal jet impingement and showerhead film cooling. The mid-chord region of the blade contains a three-pass serpentine passage with internal discrete V-shaped trip strips to enhance the internal heat transfer coefficient. The film cooling along the mid-chord of the blade uses multiple rows of shaped diffusion holes. The trailing edge is internally cooled using jet impingement and externally film cooled through partitioned cuts on the pressure side of the blade.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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