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research-article

Experimental deposition of NaCl particles from turbulent flows at gas turbine temperatures

[+] Author and Article Information
Peter R Forsyth

Oxford Thermofluids Institute, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX2 0ES, United Kingdom
pete_forsyth@hotmail.co.uk

David R.H. Gillespie

Oxford Thermofluids Institute, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX2 0ES, United Kingdom
david.gillespie@eng.ox.ac.uk

Matthew McGilvray

Oxford Thermofluids Institute, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX2 0ES, United Kingdom
matthew.mcgilvray@eng.ox.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041036 History: Received February 13, 2018; Revised July 09, 2018

Abstract

The ingestion and deposition of solid particulates within gas turbine engines has become a very significant concern for both designers and operators in recent times. Frequently aircraft are operated in environments where sand, ash, dust, and salt are present, which can drive damage mechanisms from long term component degradation to in-flight flame-out. Experiments are presented to assess deposition characteristics of sodium chloride (NaCl) at gas turbine secondary air system temperature conditions in horizontal pipe flow. Mono-disperse NaCl particles were generated in the size range 2.0 - 6.5 µm, with gas temperatures 390-480 °C, and metal temperatures 355-730 °C. Two engine-representative surface roughnesses were assessed. An experimental technique for the measurement of deposited NaCl based on solution conductivity was developed and validated. Experiments were carried out under isothermal and non-isothermal/thermophoretic conditions. An initial experimental campaign was conducted under ambient and isothermal conditions; high temperature isothermal results showed good similarity. Under thermophoretic conditions deposition rates varied by up to several orders of magnitude compared to isothermal rates.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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