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research-article

Effects of Coolant Feed Direction on Additively Manufactured Film Cooling Holes

[+] Author and Article Information
Curtis Stimpson

ASME Member, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 3127 Research Dr, State College, PA 16801, USA
curtis.stimpson@honeywell.com

Jacob C. Snyder

ASME Member, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 3127 Research Dr, State College, PA 16801, USA
jacob.snyder@psu.edu

Karen A. Thole

ASME Member, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 136 Reber Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
kthole@psu.edu

Dominic Mongillo

Pratt & Whitney, 400 Main Street, East Hartford, CT 06118, USA
dominic.mongillo@pw.utc.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041374 History: Received August 08, 2018; Revised August 27, 2018

Abstract

Gas turbine components subjected to high temperatures can benefit from improved designs enabled by metal additive manufacturing with nickel alloys. Previous studies have shown that the impact on fluid flow and heat transfer resulting from surface roughness of additively manufactured parts is significant; these impacts must be understood to design turbine components successfully for additive manufacturing. This study improves understanding of these impacts by examining the discharge coefficient and the effect of the coolant delivery direction on the performance of additively manufactured shaped film cooling holes. To accomplish this, five test coupons containing a row of baseline shaped film cooling holes were made from a high temperature nickel alloy using a laser powder bed fusion process. Flow and pressure drop measurements across the holes were collected to determine the discharge coefficient from the film cooling holes. Temperature measurements were collected to assess the overall effectiveness of the coupon surface as well as the cooling enhancement due to film cooling. The Biot number of the coupon wall was matched to a value one might find in a turbine engine to ensure this data is relevant. It was discovered that the flow experienced greater aerodynamic losses in film cooling holes with greater relative roughness, which resulted in a decreased discharge coefficient. The effectiveness measurements showed that the film cooling performance is better when coolant is fed in a co-flow configuration compared to a counter-flow configuration.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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