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research-article

Experimental and Numerical Investigation on the Shock Wave Structure Alterations and Available Energy Loss Variations with a Grooved Nozzle Vane

[+] Author and Article Information
Ben Zhao

School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, P.R. China, 100081
20903190@bit.edu.cn

Mingxu Qi

School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, P.R. China, 100081
qimx@bit.edu.cn

Harold Sun

School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, P.R. China, 100081
harold.sun@sbcglobal.net

Xin Shi

School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, P.R. China, 100081
shixin@bit.edu.cn

Chaochen Ma

School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, P.R. China, 100081
mcc1900@bit.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041819 History: Received March 19, 2018; Revised October 18, 2018

Abstract

A passive shock wave control method, using a grooved surface instead of the original smooth surface of a gas turbine nozzle vane to alter a single shock wave into a multiple shock wave structure, is investigated in this paper, so as to gain deep insight into the flow characteristics of a multiple shock wave system and its variations with various grooved surface geometry parameters. With the combination of numerical and experimental approaches, the shock wave structure and the flow behavior in a linear turbine nozzle channel with different grooved surface configurations were compared and analyzed in details. The numerical and experimental results indicate that the multiple shock wave structure induced by the grooved surface is beneficial for mitigating the intensity of the shock wave, reducing the potential excitation force of the shock wave and decreasing the shock wave loss as well. It was also found that the benefits are related to the geometry of the grooved surface, such as groove width, depth, and number. However, the presence of the grooved surface inevitably causes more viscous boundary layer loss and wake loss which maybe a bottleneck for general engineering application of such a passive shock wave mitigation method.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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