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research-article

LES and RANS Analysis of the End-Wall Flow in a Linear LPT Cascade: Part II - Loss Generation

[+] Author and Article Information
Michele Marconcini

Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, via di Santa Marta, 3, 50139 Florence, Italy
michele.marconcini@unifi.it

Roberto Pacciani

Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, via di Santa Marta, 3, 50139 Florence, Italy
Roberto.Pacciani@unifi.it

Andrea Arnone

Dept. of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, via di Santa Marta, 3, 50139 Florence, Italy
andrea.arnone@unifi.it

Vittorio Michelassi

Baker Hughes, a GE Company, Via Felice Matteucci 10, 50127, Florence, Italy
vittorio.michelassi@bhge.com

Richard Pichler

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
work@richard-pichler.at

Yaomin Zhao

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
yaomin.zhao@unimelb.edu.au

Richard Sandberg

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
richard.sandberg@unimelb.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042208 History: Received August 20, 2018; Revised December 04, 2018

Abstract

In low-pressure-turbines (LPT) at design point around 60-70% of losses are generated in the blade boundary layers far from end-walls, while the remaining 30%-40% is controlled by the interaction of the blade profile with the end-wall boundary layer. Increasing attention is devoted to these flow regions in industrial design processes. This paper discusses the end-wall flow characteristics of the T106 profile with parallel end-walls at realistic LPT conditions, as described in the experimental setup of Duden and Fottner (1997) P. I. Mech. Eng. A-J. Pow., 211 (4), pp.309-320. Calculations are carried out by both RANS, due to its continuing role as the design verification workhorse, and highly-resolved LES. Part II of the paper focuses on the loss generation associated with the secondary end-wall vortices. Entropy generation and the consequent stagnation pressure losses are analyzed following the aerodynamic investigation carried out in the companion paper (GT2018-76233). The ability of classical turbulence models generally used in RANS to discern the loss contributions of the different vortical structures is discussed in detail and the attainable degree of accuracy is scrutinized with the help of LES and the available test data. The purpose is to identify the flow features that require further modelling efforts in order to improve RANS/URANS approaches and make them able to support the design of the next generation of LPTs.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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