Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a treatable autoimmune disorder that effects the neuromuscular junction [1,2]. MG is characterized by fatigable muscle weakness of voluntary skeletal muscles with the most commonly affected muscles being the eye and facial muscles. The current estimates from North American data suggests that the prevalence of MG is around 200 per million [3]. The incidence within the South Africa population is similar to the rest of the world [1]. While MG affects individuals of all racial groups, the outcome to therapy of the disease differs across races [4]. Patients of African genetic ancestry, particularly juveniles, are more likely to develop ocular muscle complications of MG when compared to their European counterparts [5]. MG ophthalmoplegic complications include persistent difficulty in moving the eyes and blepharoptosis, despite treatment.

Blepharoptosis, abbreviated to ptosis, describes the condition of a...

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