Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S., resulting in one out of the five Americans developing skin cancer at some point in their lifetime [1]. Though melanoma accounts for only 2% of these cases, it is the leading cause of skin cancer deaths; as with all cancer, early detection before metastasis is vital for patient survival, stressing the need for effective diagnostic devices [2]. While research progresses toward new skin cancer detection devices, successful adoption of these technologies requires a robust, repeatable method for large-scale validation. Tissue mimicking phantom models have proven to be adequate as they are able to accurately model the mechanical, optical, and acoustical properties of skin.

Several types of bio-based and synthetic materials are used to simulate tissue. Agar-based tissue phantoms at different concentrations were used to test ultrasound as a stiffness imaging technique for cancerous lesions...

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