Abnormalities of muscle tone are an integral component of many chronic motor disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in children and adults. Excessive, disabling muscle tone is called ‘spasticity'. Spasticity can interfere with movement and can lead to stiff, painful joints [1]. Over half a million people in the United States and 12 million worldwide are affected by spasticity. Spasticity results from dysgenesis or injury to sensorimotor pathways in the cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, brainstem, central white matter, or spinal cord. Injury occurring in children is known as cerebral palsy (CP) [2]. In adults, CNS injury or disease associated with spasticity includes stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury.

Although the presence or absence of spasticity can be identified using current clinical scales, the accuracy of determination of spasticity severity and the relationship between severity level and deficits of voluntary movements...

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