One of greatest health threats to our aging population is cognitive decline, which can be a result of the natural aging process as well as more severe disorders such as dementia and hypertension [1]. Recent studies have demonstrated that non-pharmacological interventions such as participation in leisure activities, including general socialization, physical exercise, and/or cognitively stimulating activities (reading, playing board games and Bingo, playing musical instruments, doing crossword puzzles, etc.), are associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline in the elderly [2]. For example, the group activity of Bingo has been shown to improve confrontational naming, memory, recall, and recognition in cognitively impaired older adults in adult day care centers [3]. Bingo also has physical and social benefits as it focuses on implementing accurate motor patterns when placing game pieces on the card and can also facilitate social interactions between the players themselves [...

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