Endstage heart failure affects over 2 × 106 people worldwide, of which 15,000 to 60,000 would benefit from a heart transplant [1,2]. Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) increase survival rates when waiting on the heart transplant list [1,2] but cannot be powered by an implantable battery alone due to the high energy demand of a blood pump. This is most often accomplished by a percutaneous power cable. The insertion site of the cable is prone to infection due to compromise of the skin's ability to act as a barrier to pathogens; ∼20% of patients with VADs develop driveline infections [1,2]. The driveline could be eliminated altogether if power were transferred wirelessly to the internal device.

Coil/coil transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) have been used to provide power to these devices [3]. The coil/coil TETS has a...

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