Limb length inequalities and limb deformities are serious medical conditions that affect hundreds of patients across the U.S. but have become more treatable with the development of new medical devices and surgical techniques. Deformity correction is achieved by a procedure called distraction osteogenesis (DO), during which the surgeon manipulates the newly formed tissue (called the bone callus) to the desired orientation and length [1]. However, the procedure is prone to complications, such as angular deviations, nonunion, and premature consolidation of the callus [2,3].

Traditional lengthening devices are external to the body and rely on percutaneous pins and wires to attach to the bone. These external fixators are prone to infection at the pin tract sites, are poorly tolerated by patients, and leave significant scarring [4–6]. These devices provide lengthening by discrete displacement steps, often extending the bone callus up to a 0.25...

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