Intramedullary nailing is the most common method in treating lower limbs fractures. During operation, a crucial but tedious step is to perform the distal locking. As this procedure is normally performed under fluoroscopic guidance, excessive radiation exposure to the patients and to the physicians can be encountered [1–5]. In order to avoid such undesired radiation exposure, custom designed target-aiming devices (TADs) have been used. Unfortunately, the applicability of these TADs is usually impaired due to the unavoidable deformation of the nail when inserted into a bone cavity. Trial and error processes are often inevitable rendering this approach a time consuming and prone to error.

In this study, we propose to use a visible light source to detect the distal interlocking screw holes. By inserting a light source inside the bone cavity near a targeted screw hole, a portion of the light is able to penetrate through the hole...

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